Seth Godin shared the following on his blog today:

”I’m sitting on a black couch in the lobby of a nice theater. The couch is cracked and peeling, with seven strips of black gaffer’s tape holding it together. And you don’t have to be an interior geologist to see that it has developed this patina over time, bit by bit.

The question is: Who was the first person who decided to fix the couch with tape?

The third or fifth person did a natural thing–here’s a ratty couch, let’s keep it the best we can.

But the first taper?

The first taper decided that it was okay for this theater to have a taped couch. The first taper didn’t make the effort to alert the authorities, to insist on getting the couch repaired properly.

The first taper decided, “this is good enough for now.”

This is how we find ourselves on the road to decay.”
…..

This got me thinking.

Do our patients always know when we are just using dentistry’s version of “tape,” instead of proper restoration? If so, what is the condition of the rest of the “couch”, and do they know it and understand what that means to them long-term?

Or, have we by system or habit allowed ourselves to think “this is good enough for now, I’ll tell them about that later?”

Have we, because of insurance company pressures and our inability to price our time and services appropriately, allowed our standards to “decay”?

And perhaps even worse, are we in a situation where we can’t control the standards, the pricing, and therefore to a large degree – the quality?

Many in corporate dentistry today likely can relate to this last conundrum.

Because it’s all inter-related:

Caring enough not to compromise our standards.

Allowing ourselves enough time to do things right.

Pricing our time and services appropriately so that we can afford to spend the time to do it right – or even over again.

Developing the interpersonal skills and approaches which allow patients to better understand the bigger picture and its implications so they can make better decisions.

And then deciding together whether or not “tape” is a “good enough” decision right now.

Paul A. Henny, DDS

Read more at Codiscovery.com