Perspective is everything, particularly when it comes to working with others. Bring our biases and personal agendas into a relationship with a new patient, and the very nature of the relationship changes. Remain open-minded, and focused on THEIR agendas, THEIR biases and THEIR predilections, and we learn new things about them, our perspective shifts, OUR behavior changes, and consequently the direction of the relationship changes over time.

There is confusion in the minds of many with regard to the meaning of a “patient-centered” practice, as it does not mean the patient is always right, or that we do whatever they want in an attempt to get them to like us and continue to engage our business.

That’s pandering.

That’s manipulative, in a passive way.

That’s acting politically -thinking and speaking in ways which advance our agenda without regard for how the other person feels.

That’s demonstrating that we do not have a clarified value system, and therefore an overarching health-centered practice purpose.

And that likely means that money is the central and common denominator.

Money and the pursuit of health lie in completely different areas of the mind: One is limiting – the other limitless.

A relationship-based, health-centered practice is about seeing the oak tree in the acorn…its aspirational, expansive, facilitative, developmental, and growth-oriented.

An insurance-centric practice, where a tremendous amount of time, energy, and money is invested in code-mining, and the pursuit of reimbursement – is limiting. It’s not about growth-it’s about sales. And sales and the pursuit of health are two very different things.

So, the insurance-centric practice sees the potential profit in the plans, not the potential in the person. The insurance-centric practice is therefore largely bounded by their biases and perspective… “People tend to do only what their plan will pay for, so let’s make sure everyone maximizes their benefits.”

The person-centered practice says, “Where would you like to go? And, where would you like to be in twenty, thirty years? Have you ever thought about that?”

Developmental mindset vs. a narrow, rigid mindset.

Abundance mindset vs. scarcity mindset.

Zero sum vs. endless possibilities.

These are choices we make which then influence our behavior, and therefore everything else downstream, including our health, our patient’s health, and the health of our practice.

Paul A. Henny, DDS

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